The teachings of yoga have ethical principles that help guide us to a more comfortable way of living. Ethical principles need not be strict rules by which we judge the actions of others or something that divides us into “good” vs. “evil”. This guide provides a helpful method to break up the human experience and set us on a path that will provide more comfort in our everyday lives.

I often re-read these teachings, over and over, and seek out other people’s interpretations. I find that revisiting these teachings often highlights new ways I can incorporate them into my day to day life as I change. The following are some of the ways I have found to work for me.

The teachings are broken up into 2 parts, Niyama: how to treat ourselves and Yama: how to treat others. Each has 5 parts. The texts are written in an ancient language and have been through many translations into other languages and modern interpretations. It helps to open our minds to the more general message and how it might fit into our own modern life rather than trying to squeeze ourselves into someone else’s version of perfection or rules. The ancient language in which these texts were written is far more based on sound and vibration, more poetic than current language. Each word has many translations and many do not easily translate into current languages. It can be helpful to not get too caught up in the cognitive desperation for being exact and allow a more overall and deeper sense of the message to be absorbed. Listen with your innermost self and not so much your thinking mind. “Take what you need and leave the rest” but also invite the idea that at some other point in your life there may be new nuggets of wisdom that pop out that you may not have seen before. Look with fresh eyes and an open heart.

Yama: Do unto others

#3 Asteya: Non-Stealing

Do not take what is not yours. Simple right? Though this often seems the hardest principle to live by. Without meaning to, we often steal from each other in very subtle ways. When a friend is sharing their story we may feel excited to share a similar story and in doing so we interrupt and steal their experience of sharing with us. A loved one may be outpouring their grief and in an attempt to wrap them in love we hug them and halt the process of the processing of their own experience. When we see someone’s success and think “I wish I could be like that”, we steal from ourselves not only the joy of sharing in someone’s glow but the ability to let our own talents shine.

“Our listening creates a sanctuary for the homeless parts within another person.” – Nelle Morton

Asteya, at the deepest level, can be to abandon the intent to possess anything, material, talent, relationship, achievement, or natural resources. Our desire to define what belongs to “me” often causes us great distress. Conversely when we actively practice generosity, our lives are more pleasant. In this way Asteya can also be thought of as sharing.

When you realize that everything that you need lies within you—and that the source of all intelligence, power, strength, love, happiness, and peace lies within you—when there is nothing outside to look for, Asteya naturally starts to manifest.” 

-Yogi Amrit Desai

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Though this is a fundamental teaching in yoga, I often see Asteya being forgotten. Teachers put a slight spin on some movement philosophy, label it as uniquely their own, and set about making sure people only use their particular style if they have paid them money for their brand use. There are many infamous stories of how this can go horribly wrong. This also displays how we see truth through the lens of our own experiences. In such situations, either side sees the other as stealing. Which is the truth? The truth might be that both parties are stealing. The brand owner sees the person imitating as stealing their ideas. Yet the imitator might see all the teachings as belonging to the good of the whole and therefore sees the brand owner as the one stealing the experience from people who do not have the opportunity to learn directly from that brand owner. 

“Asteya (Non-stealing) does not mean merely not to steal. To keep or take anything which one does not need is also stealing. We are not always aware of our real needs, and most of us improperly multiply our wants and thus, unconsciously, make thieves of ourselves. One who follows the observance of Non-stealing will bring about a progressive reduction of his own wants. Much of the distressing poverty in this world has risen out of the breaches of the principle of Non-stealing.”

-Mahatma Gandhi

Another example of Asteya being forgotten in a yoga class is a teacher informing a student of how a pose should or should not look, what they should feel, and how exactly they should live their lives with which precise rules to have in place or they are not a “true yogi”. This is stealing the experience of yoga from the student. Yoga needs to be experienced, felt on all levels. The path you took might look and feel very different from the path someone else needs to take. When you find yourself judging another person’s path or style it is a good reminder for you to return to self-reflection. 

On your own mat when trying to imitate someone else’s version of a pose you may be stealing from yourself the experience of yoga. In pushing yourself into a shape your body may not be ready for or even able to perform due to one’s own bone structure you might be stealing from yourself the safety of practice and the intimate knowledge of your own physical body.

“I am here now. All of my needs are met.”

Another common practice of stealing from ourselves is the mind ruminating over past hurts or future worries. This steals from us the present moment. On a deep level we know that running over the past in our minds does not change the past. We also know that worrying about the future is not helpful. Yoga teaches us many techniques for landing in the present moment. The only moment that is real is the present moment. The past has already happened and the future is yet to come. The more we practice focusing on the present moment the more full our lives become. When our lives feel full, the less desires to grasp what is not ours control our thoughts and deeds.

“It (asteya) is restraining from making ourselves smaller or bigger than we are, or from trying to be something we are not or hiding from what we are. It is often hard to know where to draw the line in just where too much lies. Yoga addresses this dilemma beautifully: Gather all the resources you need to support your particular service in the world. No more; no less. In other words, we are asked to walk a fine line between stealing from others and stealing from ourselves. If we take more than we need, in any area of our lives, we are stealing from others. If we deny ourselves the resources we need to reach our full potential, we are stealing from ourselves.”

  • Deborah Adelle
Bee You Yoga and Wellness - Yoga Therapy, Yoga, Yoga for anxiety, Yoga for depression, Yoga for recovery, y12sr, donation based yoga & meditation for everyone, kids yoga, BARRE, Sadie Nardini Yoga Shred Fusion, Full body conditioning, Yoga Nidra, Swedish massage, myofascial release, PSYCH-K, Reiki, BARRE, ZUMBA, Yoga Shred, Bee You Yoga, Yoga 07885, Yoga 07869, Randolph, Roxbury, Mine Hill, New Jersey, North Jersey, Morris County, Yoga Morris County, Buti Yoga, yogassage, theta healing, therapeutic massage, massage gift certifcates, 07803,07806,07847,07802,07869,07876,07852,07856,07850,07885,07845,07801,07970,07857,07843,07836,07834,07842,07926,07950,07878,07945,07849,07874,07837,07866,07930,07828,07046,07963,07962,07927,07960,07821,07005,07981,07054,07924,07961,07820,07034,07840,07438,07931,07976,07977,07871,07879,07934,07939,07045,07870,07853,07940,07935,07932,07936,07839,07082,07058,07405,07439,07979,07933,07920,07946,07980,07938,07928,07880,07435,08858,07830,07039